Why KU D-end Dorance Armstrong didn't try to pull a Julius Peppers and play college basketball

FILE — North Carolina's Julius Peppers dunks in the fourth quarter of their 80-74 win over Wake Forest at the Joel Coliseum in Winston-Salem, N.C., Tuesday Feb. 6, 2001. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

FILE — North Carolina's Julius Peppers dunks in the fourth quarter of their 80-74 win over Wake Forest at the Joel Coliseum in Winston-Salem, N.C., Tuesday Feb. 6, 2001. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Back before he became the No. 2 overall pick in the 2002 NFL Draft, defensive end Julius Peppers spent his football offseasons in Chapel Hill, N.C., helping the University of North Carolina’s vaunted basketball program win ACC and postseason games.

So when the Kansas basketball team this season ran into such depth issues that head coach Bill Self only played six Jayhawks 20 or more minutes in each of the first three games it stood to reason some multi-skilled athlete from the KU football team with a basketball past might become useful inside Allen Fieldhouse.

I was convinced Kansas junior defensive end Dorance Armstrong Jr. was the perfect man for the job. The 6-foot-4, 246-pound Armstrong might not be quite as imposing at the 6-7, 290-pound Peppers was, but it’s the same idea: put a freakishly athletic, muscle-bound pass-rusher on the court, let him intimidate opponents and/or wreak havoc on the rim. In other words: Grab your popcorn, sit back and enjoy.

That was basically my pitch to Armstrong recently during one of his weekly interview sessions. So had the former big man at Houston’s North Shore High, where he played on a 5A state championship team in 2014, ever entertained the idea of going back to his hoops roots at Kansas?

“Nuh-uh,” Armstrong replied, while shaking his head and grinning. “No.”

Kansas defensive end Dorance Armstrong Jr. (2) sacks Texas Tech quarterback Nic Shimonek (16) during the second quarter on Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017 at Memorial Stadium.

Kansas defensive end Dorance Armstrong Jr. (2) sacks Texas Tech quarterback Nic Shimonek (16) during the second quarter on Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017 at Memorial Stadium. by Nick Krug

Armstrong has to be one of the most hulking individual’s on KU’s campus. And you have to admit, it seems like the basketball roster could use another big body.

“I don’t know. I don’t really get into it. My focus is all here. I feel like they’ve got everything taken care of over there,” Armstrong assessed. “So I’ll keep my focus over here and try and get this thing flipped.”

But what about Peppers? That’s proof it could work, right? The defensive end/power forward averaged 7.1 points and and 4.0 rebounds in his second (and final) basketball season at UNC (2000-01).

“No, my basketball days are over with,” Armstrong said with a laugh. “I haven’t been on the court in a minute. Can’t even run up and down that thing no more.”

Armstrong actually scored in double figures several times during his final prep season at North Shore. But as it turns out, an even more skilled basketball player existed on the KU football roster: backup sophomore tight end James Sosinski.

Longtime Self assistant Norm Roberts told his boss about Sosinski, who played previously at South Mountain Community College, in Phoenix, Ariz., after Roberts ran into the tight end’s father at a KU football game. Then Self called KU football coach David Beaty to inquire further.

“Of course David’s great, and he was totally open to him coming out,” Self added.

Armstrong never was going to be the KU basketball equivalent of Peppers at UNC, and Sosinski won’t be either. Self is giving the 6-7 former club teammate of Mitch Lightfoot a look at practices to see how the tight end might fit in and be of use in KU’s shallow front court. If it ever reaches a point where Sosinski is checking into a game for Self’s Jayhawks, the coach predicts it wouldn’t be more than “maybe a minute or two here or there,” no different than when he goes to walk-ons Clay Young and Chris Teahan.

Self revealed this won’t be the first time he borrowed some talent from a football program.

“We did it at Illinois,” Self said. “Illinois had a wide receiver who actually played in the NFL, a kid named Walter Young, and he was a good high school player. For whatever reason we were short on depth — in practice, not in games.”

Young played sparingly for Self’s Illini in the 2001-02 season, averaging 1.0 points and 2.5 minutes per game before becoming a seventh-round NFL Draft pick in 2003.

“I don’t think it has anything to do with that he played football,” Self added. “I think it was just that that was the best possibility on campus.”

Sosinski falls into the same category now for Kansas. Even though it would’ve been fascinating to see a second-team All-Big 12 defensive lineman like Armstrong out in transition for a break-away jam. We’ll just have to settle for a backup tight end.