Six former Kansas standouts entering free agency

Los Angeles Lakers forward Thomas Robinson, left, and Sacramento Kings guard Langston Galloway reach for a rebound during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Friday, April 7, 2017, in Los Angeles. The Lakers won 98-94. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

Los Angeles Lakers forward Thomas Robinson, left, and Sacramento Kings guard Langston Galloway reach for a rebound during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Friday, April 7, 2017, in Los Angeles. The Lakers won 98-94. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

It’s safe to assume NBA executives and head coaches won’t be jostling for position at the front doors of any former Kansas basketball players before the stroke of midnight Friday night, when it officially becomes July 1 and the league’s anticipated free agency period commences. But some of the biggest names in recent KU history will hit the open market this summer.

To get a sense of the demand — or lack there of — for the Jayhawks looking to sign new contracts, peruse Matt Moore’s list at CBSSports.com of the top 60 available free agents. You won’t find a single former Kansas player.

Still, six one-time KU stars whose college successes paved the way to lucrative careers in basketball figure to either re-up with their current employers or find new niches with other organizations as they ink new deals. Here’s a rundown of the available Jayhawks.

Thomas Robinson

Every time former KU All-American Thomas Robinson joins a different NBA team, it’s easy to think the change of scenery and/or playing for a new staff will help him achieve the breakout season that has eluded him since Sacramento made him the No. 5 overall pick in the 2012 draft. Five seasons and six teams into his career, though, the 6-foot-10 power forward has yet to emerge as a consistent contributor.

It took until September, just before training camps opened, for Robinson to sign with the Lakers in 2016, and some uncertainty likely awaits the explosively athletic 26-year-old again. After averaging 5.0 points and 4.6 rebounds in 11.7 minutes (48 appearances) for L.A., Robinson said following his end-of-season exit interview with Lakers brass they neither told him they wanted to re-sign him nor that they didn’t.

What he did learn, however, from Lakers president Magic Johnson, general manager Rob Pelinka and coach Luke Walton was that Robinson, in his fifth season, began to pick up on the smaller nuances of the game. The free agent big said he used to overlook such details, and heard from Lakers brass those areas should be his focus this offseason.

“I plan to commit myself to getting better at the mental part of the game and seeing the game a little better,” Robinson said, adding he wants to reach the level of a grizzled veteran who knows it all. “I want to get that part of my game better, and I think that’ll take me to another level and also help me in helping the team.”

Which team that will be next season remains to be seen.

Ben McLemore

Sacramento Kings guard Ben McLemore (23) in the second half of an NBA basketball game Monday, March 6, 2017, in Denver. The Nuggets won 108-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Sacramento Kings guard Ben McLemore (23) in the second half of an NBA basketball game Monday, March 6, 2017, in Denver. The Nuggets won 108-96. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

After four seasons of toiling with the Kings, Ben McLemore’s days in Sacramento are all but officially through. The organization declined to extend a qualifying offer to the shooting guard, making him an unrestricted free agent, capable of reaching terms with the franchise of his choice without the fear of the Kings having the right to match an offer and retain his services.

McLemore played a career-low 19.3 minutes a game this past season, when he averaged 8.1 points and shot 43 percent from the field (38.2 percent on 3-pointers).

At 24, the 6-foot-5 guard remains young and athletic enough for teams to take interest in him as a backup guard. The Kings’ poor reputation within the league means some decision-makers will give McLemore a pass on proven shortcomings with the plan to stimulate his career.

Jeff Withey

Utah Jazz's Jeff Withey (24) drives against Cleveland Cavaliers' LeBron James (23) in the first half of an NBA basketball game, Thursday, March 16, 2017, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

Utah Jazz's Jeff Withey (24) drives against Cleveland Cavaliers' LeBron James (23) in the first half of an NBA basketball game, Thursday, March 16, 2017, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

Another career NBA backup from KU, center Jeff Withey spent the past two seasons in a limited role for Utah. The 7-footer appeared in 51 games for the Jazz both years, but Withey only played 8.5 minutes a night in 2016-17, averaging 2.9 points and 2.4 rebounds.

Nonetheless, Withey recently told the Journal-World he’s open to re-signing with Utah, where he would continue to make cameo appearances, playing behind Rudy Gobert and Derrick Favors.

“Utah, in general, is just a great organization,” Withey said. “I love my time there.”

The 27-year-old big man likely would take on similar playing time for another franchise, should he sign elsewhere.

Brandon Rush

Minnesota Timberwolves' Brandon Rush plays during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Dallas Mavericks Friday, Feb. 24, 2017, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

Minnesota Timberwolves' Brandon Rush plays during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Dallas Mavericks Friday, Feb. 24, 2017, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

Looking to join up with a team to become a 10-year veteran in the league, Brandon Rush, who turns 32 in July, is in the latter stages of his career.

Even so, Rush is coming off a season in which he played 21.9 minutes a game for Minnesota — his highest average since the 2011-12 season — putting up 4.2 points and 2.1 rebounds.

That doesn’t mean the Timberwolves will bring Rush back as a bench wing capable of defending and knocking down an occasional 3-pointer (44-for-114 in his ninth year). The team already made a big offseason splash by trading for all-star Jimmy Butler, and free agency provides Minnesota with a chance to bring in another major contributor. In order to facilitate the cap space, though, role players such as Rush likely won’t be re-signed.

Nick Collison

Oklahoma City Thunder forward Nick Collison (4) shoots a basket against the Los Angeles Clippers during the second half of an NBA basketball game in Oklahoma City, Friday, Nov. 11, 2016. Los Angeles won 110-108. (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)

Oklahoma City Thunder forward Nick Collison (4) shoots a basket against the Los Angeles Clippers during the second half of an NBA basketball game in Oklahoma City, Friday, Nov. 11, 2016. Los Angeles won 110-108. (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)

With 13 NBA seasons behind him, veteran power forward Nick Collison won’t play much in Year 14, but the longtime Oklahoma City reserve plans to stick around for at least another season.

Considering Collison’s days with the franchise date back to before the Thunder relocated from Seattle, it would be strange to see him in another NBA uniform. The 6-foot-10 big who will turn 37 before the start of next season indicated following his OKC exit interview a couple months back he had a strong enough relationship with the front office that they should be honest with each other about their expectations once negotiations begin.

“I think both sides just have to find the best thing,” Collison said, “and we'll figure it out.”

Mario Chalmers

Memphis Grizzlies guard Mario Chalmers (6) controls the ball against Los Angeles Lakers guard Louis Williams (23) during the second half of an NBA basketball game Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2016, in Memphis, Tenn. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill)

Memphis Grizzlies guard Mario Chalmers (6) controls the ball against Los Angeles Lakers guard Louis Williams (23) during the second half of an NBA basketball game Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2016, in Memphis, Tenn. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill)

Mario Chalmers missed the entire 2016-17 season as he rehabbed a torn Achilles tendon in his right foot. But the former KU star is only a little over a year removed from averaging 10.8 points a game for Memphis.

Back in Lawrence earlier this month to play with and against current and former Kansas players, Chalmers said he felt close to returning to the NBA this past spring as a late-season signing.

“But within myself I just wasn’t comfortable,” Chalmers added. “So I was the one who told my agent, ‘I’m going to shut it down for the year and just get healthy.’”

Any number of teams in search of a veteran guard would put a healthy Chalmers on their lists of possible targets. Now 31, the combo guard who made a name for himself with Miami and LeBron James, should resurface next season.

He said he’d be open to taking on a starting or reserve role, and will be searching for the best overall opportunity.

Comments

Tracey Graham

Remember, Kirk Hinrich isn't officially retired, so if decides to play this season, that would make seven FAs. (I have a feeling he is basically retired, though)

I think Ben is the guy who is likely to get the best deal. He's still only 24 years old. And I just saw a quote on twitter about how every coaching staff he played for in Sacramento praised his work ethic. He just needs to land somewhere that has a stable coaching situation. In Sacramento, he had what -- four head coaches in his four seasons?

I think Nick will simply sign a vet min deal with the Thunder. They love him and he doesn't seem interested in going anywhere. Given that he's about to 37, it's not like he would have a big role on any team. If he wanted to chase a ring, he could see if GS or Cle had interest, but I think GS is more focused on trying to sign heir own FAs, if they can. Don't know about the Cavs.

I wouldn't be surprised if B-Rush ended up back on Minnesota. He isn't likely to find a bigger role on another team. And even with Butler, the T-Wolves could use more vet leadership. It depends on whether the T-Wolves can land a bigger name. FAs should have interest in playing with Butler, Towns & Wiggins, but Thibs' reputation as a coach who can push his players too hard could keep them away.

I just saw on ESPN that there is going too many more supply than demand for PGs than expected this offseason, because teams that needed a PG either drafted one (or, in the Kings' case, 2) or traded for one. There are a lot of PGs on the FA market, so it might take Chalmers awhile to land somewhere. Especially because not too many players completely recover from torn achilles tendons, so there's a lot of uncertainty there.

Withey should be able to land a smallish contract as a 3rd center. He would have been better off if he had been born 10-20 years earler, though, given his game would've fit better into the style of play in the 1980s and 1990s more than it does in today's game. Still, you'd think some team would sign him as a rim protecting backup big (assuming his legal problems with his ex have been resolved, anyway).

T-Rob might want to think about looking overseas. He's been on six teams in fve years and he's never been able to stick anywhere, despite putting up some decent numbers when he actually gets some playing time. He's only 26. Maybe if he went overseas for 2 years and developed the areas of his game he's been told to work on, he could improve enough to stir up more interest. He's only be 28 if he did that...still young enough to get interest from NBA teams. If he tried to hook on with another NBA team now, I have a feeling it would be the same old same old ...bouncing from team to team and languishing on the bench.

4 months, 3 weeks ago

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Tracey Graham

Add another name to the list. The Lakers waived Tarik Black today (Saturday). Looks like they did so just to save a little bit of money, as his contract was just about to get guaranteed.

I don't think Tarik will have much trouble landing another NBA job though.Teams always need backup bigs who play with great effort and know how to rebound the ball.

4 months, 3 weeks ago

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